Police Blotter

Coronado Police Department

The Coronado Police Department reported the following arrests, traffic collisions and crimes as of March 29. If you see a crime, please report it to the police.

 

Arrests:

  • Petty theft with a prior and committing a felony while out on bail, Escondido male, 28, Naval Air Station North Island, March 25.
  • DUI, San Diego man, 36, 900 block of Orange Avenue, March 28.
  • Theft and conspiracy to commit a crime, juvenile, 16, 1100 block of Orange Avenue, March 24.
  • Theft and conspiracy to commit a crime, Coronado man, 18, 1100 block of Orange Avenue, March 24.
  • Outside warrant, Escondido man, 33, 1700 block of Glorietta Plaza, March 22.
  • DUI, San Diego woman, 49, 1300 block of First Street, March 22.
  • Possession of drug paraphernalia and a syringe, use of a controlled substance, Coronado woman, 29, 100 block of F Avenue, March 21.

 

Traffic Collisions:

  • An unknown vehicle struck a silver Toyota Prius parked on Third Street, just east of H Avenue, no injuries, Feb. 26.  This incident was a hit-and-run.

 

Crimes:

  • Stolen black Electra bicycle, 900 block of Orange Avenue, March 26. Bike was locked.
  • Stolen Felt Collage bicycle, garage on the 400 block of B Avenue, March 27.
  • Report of domestic violence, 500 block of D Avenue, March 28.
  • Report of domestic violence, Half Moon Bend, March 24.
  • Stolen iPod, car parked on the 500 block of Country Club Lane, March 2-3.
  • Embezzlement (stolen currency worth $1,100), money drawer at Armed Forces Bank Branch 93, March 7.


3 Comments

  • johnny_boy_12582

    What is the definition of a Police blotter entry?
    HI. I am seeking different definitions of "Police blotter entries" and why Police would rather take a blotter entry instead of an actual complaint. Is it an easy way out of doing paperwork? Also, how then are Police Blotters handled, in other words, who decides and how is it decided whether there will be a follow up…. Any former officers who can shed some light?

  • Kelle

    (US) A register, maintained by the desk sergeant, of people arrested or brought in for questioning to a police station.
    References :

  • Jay

    Its an antiquated term where the desk sergeant would write down the names of arrested persons in a log book. There are no more desk sergeants and no more police blotters.
    References :

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